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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
recreational use of marijuana, which will mark the beginning of the end of the war on drugs. this may be the most costly and futile war the united states has ever waged. we've spent $1 trillion to fight this war without reducing availableability of drugs while also destroying our pea nal system. according to data from the oecd. about 1 president 6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicates that americans have begun rethunking these policies, perhaps moving toward ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most sturching shift came not in the pass of a ball let measure but an exit poll finding, one that mierch move us. >> when asked what to do, almost two-thirds wanted to grant them legal access. john mccain had to run away from his own handiwork when he was campaigning for the white house. i hesitate to build a grand narrative out of all of this, but the trend seems to be toward individual freedom, self-expression, and dignity for all. this divers
perspective. we've assembled experts from europe, middle east, and asia to tell us how the rest of the world sees this election. then i have a panel of distinguished historians, walter isa isaacson, sean wilentz and edmund morris to look at an eye to the past. what do past campaigns and past presidents tell us about this nail-biter? also americans might be anxious to learn tuesday's results of the chinese are even more anxious, perhaps, to learn who their new leaders will be, why they might have more at stake than we do. but first here's my take. whoever wins the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling debacle. how did the world's greatest democracy start functioning so badly? maybe the next president can try to fix this broader problem. but first the fiscal cliff. unless congress act, the spending cuts and tack incr
voted to legalize recreational use of marijuana, which will mark the beginning of the end of the war on drugs. this may be the most costly, distorting and futile war the united states has ever waged. over the past four decades we have spent $1 trillion to fight this war, without reducing the availability of drugs in cities, while also destroying our penal system. the u.s. has more than three times as many prisoners per capita as we had in 1980 and about ten times as many prisoners per capita as other rich countries, according to data from the oecd. about 1.6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicate that americans have begun rethinking these policies, perhaps moving towards ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow our police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most stunning shift this week came not in the passage of a ballot measure or law but an exit poll finding, one that might move us toward major legislation. when asked what should be done with the almost 12 million illegal immigran
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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